head medicine

Oct. 21st, 2017 06:46 pm
kore: (Beth Gibbons - music)
[personal profile] kore


The Source feat. Candi Staton (Now Voyager mix 2006)
kore: (Brain fail)
[personal profile] kore
As Susan Tschudi, marriage and family therapist and author of Loving Someone with Attention Deficit Disorder, would explain to me....ADHD is basically an allergy to boredom.


....ahahaha this is EXACTLY how I have been describing myself most of my life ("low boredom threshold," "I need a book going to calm down and think," "allergic to boredom," "if I get bored I will get in trouble"). Haha! //cries

(Yeah the treating the ADD thing has kind of gone by the wayside because I was on Vyvanse!, and Vyvanse! was motherfucking expensive and seemed to peter out, and they were also all hassling me about my blood pressure ((which is FINE)) and then a later doc terrified me about being overweight and taking stimulants and heart failure. sigh. I dunno. It also seemed to kind of set off my hypomania. On the other hand I've been napping every three hours again so....)

(no subject)

Oct. 1st, 2017 11:38 am
ashtoreth: (A on fire)
[personal profile] ashtoreth
Image from Stepahnie Law


As my friends and those familiar with my blogging know, from time to time I raze this landscape and begin anew, curious to see what things rise from the ashes.

October, being bonfire month, is a good time for this.

See you on the otherside of the smoke.

Image detail from Stephanie Law.
ashtoreth: (still life with halloween)
[personal profile] ashtoreth
1. What book frightened you as a young person? - The Holy Bible. There is some seriously messed-up shit in that book.
2. If you had to become a ‘living book (i.e. able to recite the contents of a book cover to cover upon request – reference Fahrenheit 451), what book would it be? - The entire corpus of J.R.R. Tolkien's works on Middle Earth.
3. What movie or TV show scared you as a kid? The Exorcist. Watched it when I was 12 and had a fever of 102F. Insomnia, sickness, and demons are not a good combination.
4. What movie (scary or otherwise) will you never ever watch? It.
5. Do you have any phobias? No, all of my fears are quite rational, thank you.

Tor.com giveaway of Winter Tide

Oct. 19th, 2017 04:13 pm
boxofdelights: (Default)
[personal profile] boxofdelights
Tor.com is giving away the ebook of Winter Tide by Ruthanna Emrys until midnight October 20.

It is a response to Lovecraft, but Kirkus describes it as "essentially a story about identity, found families, wrapped in a cozy mystery. With magic. And monsters. Except the monsters are not exactly who you expect them to be."

https://giveaway.tor.com/

reading wednesday

Oct. 19th, 2017 02:19 am
boxofdelights: (Default)
[personal profile] boxofdelights
[This is actually from last Wednesday but I'm just going to post it now anyway]
• What are you reading?

Notes from a Feminist Killjoy, by Erin Wunker. It's a bits-and-pieces book, but all the bits are in conversation with other writers, and with reality; even its bittyness recalls how Tillie Olsen would carry a sentence in her mind, polishing it in scraps of time between interruptions, through a day of women's work, a day of no peace, no privacy, no silence, no solitude.
When I started this book, I wanted to write something unimpeachable. Something so clear and objective, it could be a little dictionary or translation phrase book for how to speak a feminist language and live a feminist life. I wanted what many other writers -- the many-gendered mothers of my heart -- had already written. I wanted A Room of One's Own, Sister Outsider, Willful Subjects, Islands of Decolonial Love. I wanted Feminism is for Everybody and The Dream of a Common Language. I wanted No Language is Neutral.

I wanted books that had already been written by people whose experiences of moving through the world are different -- often radically so -- from mine.

*

I got stuck.
*
I read some more.
*
I remembered that I tell my students that reading and writing are attempts at joining conversations, making new ones, and, sometimes, shifting the direction of discourse.
*
I sat down at my typewriter again.


• What did you recently finish reading?

George & Lizzie, by Nancy Pearl.

Lizzie agreed. "I remember reading a novel in which one of the characters, a college professor, was writing a book on the influence of Emily Dickinson on Shakespeare and how his colleagues always misheard it and thought it was the other way around. I wish I could remember the title, because talking about it now makes me want to read it again. It's so interesting to think about. Do you think we read Shakespeare differently because of Dickinson's poems?"


I remember reading that too! It was by David Lodge, I think Changing Places? I read it about the same age Lizzie did. Not at the same time: I'm maybe ten years older than Lizzie. But, like Lizzie, I grew up in Michigan and went to UM and struggled with depression most of my life and, as a young woman, tried to claim my sexuality in ways that were bad for me and for the people I interacted with. Lizzie feels real to me, is what I'm saying, and I'm okay with the fact that the people around her are kind of one-note because the problem this book is about is: if you can't stop being sad about your shitty childhood even though your life is no longer shitty, if you can't stop punishing yourself for bad choices that you made long ago, if you can't stop trying to change something that happened long ago and wasn't in your control even then. . . then how do you stop?
[Lizzie says] "They're your thoughts, right? How can you not think them?"
Marla struggled to answer. "I don't know, but people do it. I think I let go of things, or at least try to. You have to, really, otherwise you're weighted down with all those cumulative bad memories. James and I used to talk about that baby missing from our lives, whether it was a boy or a girl, whether we could find out who adopted it, whether we'd ever forgive our parents, why we didn't just say 'Screw you' to them back then and get married after I got pregnant. I mean, you know, it was so present. It was always there in our lives. But if we kept that up there'd be no place for anything else. And now we just acknowledge all that awful stuff happened, that maybe we made the wrong decision, that we were just kids. We were just kids. You have to forgive yourself eventually, right?"

Lizzie's husband George got famous by explaining that, while pain is inevitable, suffering is optional, but his explanation doesn't work for Lizzie. George doesn't seem to understand that, for some people, that's liberating, but for others, it says that your suffering was your choice and therefore your fault. I'd offer Lizzie Season of Mists, because "you don't have to stay anywhere forever" worked for me, but how a story works depends as much on the reader as on the story.

Which is not to say that we shouldn't do our best to write good stories. This one has a stupid editing oversight that dumped me right out:
[Marla:]"I love you Lizzie, and always will. And I will always, always, keep your secrets. But this, what this means to you and George, is an important secret. It's not the equivalent of a little white lie. It'd be like me not telling James about the abortion."
[Lizzie:]"But James knew about the abortion, he was with you when you had it."
"Don't be deliberately naive, it doesn't become you. You know what I mean: some other James I was involved with."


What abortion, I wondered? Was there an abortion as well as a baby given up for adoption? When?

No, it must have been changed from an abortion to an adoption at some point. Which was a good change: it's believable that Marla would find it harder to move on with her life after carrying the baby for nine months, while knowing that there was a person out there that she felt responsible for but had no ability to protect. But leaving evidence of the change in the story made me notice how flat all the other characters are, how they are the way they are in order to serve Lizzie's story.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, by H.P. Lovecraft.

GODDAMMIT.

Oct. 18th, 2017 03:24 pm
kore: (Default)
[personal profile] kore
It's been coming for a long while now, but....still. Damn.



NaNoWriMo!

Oct. 17th, 2017 09:18 pm
clare_dragonfly: quill pen and spiral notebok (Writing: quill and notebook)
[personal profile] clare_dragonfly
If you like NaNo or my writing and also Twitter, you may be interested to know that I am doing polls on Twitter to make decisions for my NaNo novel! I am hoping to write something silly this year to ease the burden on my poor pregnant brain, and crowdsourcing my ideas seems like a great way to keep it silly and engaging.

The first poll, about what world the novel should be set in, is up now! https://twitter.com/clarekrmiller/status/920088468491038721
kore: (Default)
[personal profile] kore
FEATURING GIL-SCOTT HERON NO LESS



//just lies in bed watching it repeatedly

All the noise, noise, noise

Oct. 15th, 2017 12:35 pm
musyc: Silver flute resting diagonally across sheet music (Default)
[personal profile] musyc
I've mentioned before that the property behind my house is a cow field. The cows had calves, as they do, and the calves frolicked through the field, as they do.

A couple of days ago, the farmer separated the cows and the calves, as they do. (Gotta wean the calves, sell them later, that sort of thing.) This particular farmer uses a fence-line weaning process, which is ... pretty much what it sounds like. The cows and calves are being kept apart by just a fence. Which means all those cows can still see and hear the calves.

Which means there has been CONSTANT MOOING for the past two days.

Now, it's less stressful for the calves to get weaned this way - they don't use up a lot of strength or lose excess weight by walking around looking for their dams. But the noise. The calling and calling. Allllll that mooing. Egads.
noelfigart: (Default)
[personal profile] noelfigart




So, last week, I thought I'd try something with apples and leeks with pork in rosemary and red wine. Sounds great, right?

Well, that dish on top was what I did. I asked The Prince how he liked it and he shrugged. Since I'm making these meals at least in part because I want to post articles on my blog about them, I asked him what was wrong. His comment, "The pasta is okay and all, but you know that apples, onions and sweet potato dish you do in the Fall? I think that's what this dish is really calling for."

He was right.

The dish I do every fall? I slice apples, sweet potatoes, and onions, layer them in a dish with a bit of butter on top, cover, and bake. Delicious, and if you have an oven, I encourage you to try it. A friend of mine back over a decade ago brought it to a family meal once, and it really is very, very good.

Using The Prince's inspiration, I adapted this to a one-skillet meal you'll be sure to love. The pasta version is okay. The sweet potato version is All That's Good About Fall is and like angels singing.

Equipment you'll need:

  • Deep Skillet with a cover.

  • A source of heat that's reliably even

  • A sharp knife

  • A Cutting board


Pork Chops Graced with Autumn Goodness



  • 1 pork chop for each person you're serving. They should be reasonably thick.

  • 1 Medium apple, diced. I prefer the tartness of a Granny Smith to contrast with the sweetness of the sweet potato, but a firm, sweet apple would also be okay.

  • 2 cups sliced leeks

  • 2 cups sweet potato, cut into 2-inch cubes

  • 3 T olive oil

  • ¼ c red wine

  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary, or 2 T ground rosemary

  • Salt and pepper to taste




Heat olive oil in a pan on medium. Add sweet potatoes and cook ~10 minutes, covered.



They should start to be softer around the edges but still firm. Add leeks and apple with rosemary and cook another 5-7 minutes covered until leeks become tender.



Add red wine and pork chops, sprinkling with salt and pepper. Cook about 3 minutes on a side until cooked through.



Serve.

(The Prince insists that I must add the caution that one should not count on leftovers)
elf: John Egbert with a rocketpack, captioned "THIS IS STUPID" in all caps. (This is stupid)
[personal profile] elf
I have to watch episodes with several breaks, because TEH STOOPID bothers me.

I mean, there's the standard TV show stupid where characters have to tell each other things that they already know, so that we the audience can catch up on what happened since last season. Fine. Normal TV stupid.

There's the stupid of watching combat scenes - streets somehow devoid of cars except for those belonging to the villains; martial artists spinning into HTH despite facing their opponents and having a clear path between them (you don't turn your back on an enemy if you don't get something from it - sure, spinning around may get you leverage for an attack, but nobody did that); old Western-style one-shot-insta-death bullet wounds (except, of course, for any character with a name), and so on. TV violence stupid. Fine. Normal.

There's the interpersonal drama stupid, which includes both "let's talk about stuff that we would never directly say, except for the audience to catch up" and "let's make sure the audience has been informed, AGAIN, of exactly who has what relationship with whom." Bleh. Fine. Gotta throw in some backstory exposition for the new watchers. Then there's the mind games and secrets bullshit, where everyone pretends that they haven't spent five years learning that you need to rely on your teammates and that means telling them when something weird is going on. Fine. Emotionally constipated characters in order to stretch out the tension.

There's also spoilerific stupid, so I'm putting that behind a cut. )

Fiction: Queen of the Hill

Oct. 13th, 2017 08:44 pm
clare_dragonfly: Reid standing with his hands together, text: the profile suggests that the UNSUB is an itsy bitsy spider. (CM: Reid: itsy bitsy spider)
[personal profile] clare_dragonfly
Title: Queen of the Hill
World: Ursulan
Word count: 440
Rating: G
Prompt: Thimbleful Thursday: king of the hill
Notes: Here's a fun little story about Gwanwyn (Gawain), Grainne (Gaheris), and Agravain as kids. I'm thinking Gwanwyn is about eleven here.


Gwanwyn was the oldest, the biggest, and the strongest, but Agravain still tried to be the winner of all their games. This was unfortunate, because it meant she had to keep beating him, and he hated to be beaten.

But how could he win? He was three years younger than she was, still two inches shorter though he’d started to grow faster in the last year, and his arm was probably half as wide around as hers was, despite the fact that he just kept trying to wrestle her.Read more... )

Way hey, up she rises

Oct. 13th, 2017 08:00 pm
musyc: Metallicar from Supernatural, captioned "keep calm and carry on my wayward son" (Supernatural: Keep calm)
[personal profile] musyc
So, who nearly died today?

*raises hand*

Yes, that would be me.

There I was, leaving my grandmother's house after wishing her a happy 82nd birthday. Busy minor highway outside the town where she lives. Light turns yellow. Dad has enough time to stop, though it's going to be a bit abrupt.

The semi BARRELING along behind us did NOT have enough time/distance to stop. And he sure as hell wasn't paying attention to this fact.

Thank all your little winged angels that the turn lane to the right was empty, because the semi driver had to haul into that lane. Missed our rear bumper by .... oh, I'd say about three foot. He wouldn't have come to a complete stop until his cab was on the far side of the intersection.

So yeah, I was about a yard away from getting the grille of a semi through my brain this afternoon.

FUN TIMES, AMIRITE?
kore: (Prozac nation)
[personal profile] kore
*tries blacklisting The Good Place everywhere because it stomps nearly every single one of my buttons hard, especially paranoia† and derealization and 'everything is a trick'*

Oh, apparently it ate Yuletide? Just fucking great.


(This is not even 'consistent.' I love Shirley Jackson and Philip K. Dick and other mindbending works about what is real and what isn't and how do we tell and how can we tell and so on. But every so often there's something that lines up too well with the cracks in my head, I guess is a way to put it, like the wolf sections of Kiernan's Drowning Girl or bits of Donnie Darko and my brain's like WHA HUNH NO WE'RE FREAKING OUT NOW PREPARE FOR PANIC PLEASE MAKE SURE YOUR TRAY TABLES ARE IN THEIR FULL UPRIGHT POSITIONS RIGHT UP YOUR ASS. It's one of those things that is so idiosyncratic but also hits me so hard I don't really know what to do.)



Yeah I have had actual paranoia. It is not funny. Mental illness is not quirky and cute. -- Also yeah, I tried to watch some clips of it to see if I was just being silly and the effect would lessen. SPOILER: IT GOT KIND OF BIGGER

music in the air

Oct. 13th, 2017 09:10 am
kore: (Orpheus & Eurydice)
[personal profile] kore
Rhiannon Giddens, one of the winners of this year's "genius grants" performing the great Rosetta Tharpe song "Up Above My Head":



STUNNING live version on Jools Holland:



Meet Rhiannon Giddens, Newly Minted MacArthur 'Genius' (NPR)

In her recordings and live performances, Giddens has mined the history of the African American string band tradition, introducing new audiences to the black banjoists and fiddlers whose influences have been left out of popular narratives of the lineage of folk and country music. Giddens is a native of the Piedmont region of North Carolina, and she trained as an opera singer before returning to North Carolina to immerse herself in traditional American roots music through study of archival recordings and the mentorship of the octogenarian fiddler Joe Thompson. Having honed her skills on the fiddle and 5-string banjo, she co-founded with two other bandmates the Carolina Chocolate Drops in order to share this tradition with a new generation of listeners. More recently, Giddens has released two solo albums. Tomorrow Is My Turn (2015) offers riveting interpretations of songs that were written or made famous by women, spanning folk, bluegrass, country, gospel, jazz, Celtic, and other genres. Freedom Highway (2017) consists mainly of original compositions by Giddens, and the album traverses the experience of African Americans from slavery to the present. Drawing inspiration from slave narratives, early twentieth-century songwriters such as Mississippi John Hurt, and even a rap about police violence written by her nephew, Freedom Highway is at once a recuperation of suppressed voices and a history lesson. - (MacArthur Foundation)

I suppose I'm getting some Pathfinder

Oct. 11th, 2017 08:31 pm
elf: Life's a die, and then you bitch. (Gamer Geek)
[personal profile] elf
I have basically played no D&D since 1st ed AD&D. I remember writing up a character in 2nd ed (oh look; elves can finally be druids!) and again in... 3.5, maybe? But I don't remember actually playing in either of those; if I did, it was a single session of getting-the-party-together that later went nowhere.

I'm vaguely aware that D&D and Pathfinder are similar but not the same. I don't particularly need to know; until D&D gives up on the stupidity that is alignments (I do hear they've dropped alignment languages, at least) and the notion of dozens of character classes to allow variety instead of switching to a point system that actually lets people build the players they want... not particularly interested. D&D as a system is designed for a particular type of play, or at best, a particular range of types of play, none of which appeal to me.

I keep coming back to, "why aren't they using GURPS" if they want granular details about combat and character building, or, "why don't they switch to FATE" if they want free-flowing story adventures.

Anyway. Humble Bundle has Pathfinder books on sale, and in the way of HB, a large swarm are available for the $1 minimum. I'll get that.

I scrolled down. Normally, there's a $1 ("pay what you want") level, a mid ($8 here), and a $15 level. This time, there's also higher levels. At the top, for $45, you can get a set of miniatures.

The Red Sonja figurine shows everything I hate about D&D, the high fantasy genre, and the tabletop RPG industry.

Small update to neighbor shenanigans

Oct. 10th, 2017 05:00 pm
musyc: Calvin and Hobbes hugging (Other: Calvin and Hobbes Hug)
[personal profile] musyc
The puppies have been surrendered to the humane society; the kitten has been Officially Surrendered, not just seized. (The kitten has gotten much much better, I am told. Doing well.) The authorities are working with my neighbor to get the adult dog spayed and vetted, and she has had a Very Severe Talking-To About Animal Care. Very Severe, as in law enforcement involvement apparently, so that will hopefully get things sunk in. All the sympathies and good thoughts were much appreciated, thank you.

(no subject)

Oct. 9th, 2017 11:36 pm
mindsplinters: (don't know)
[personal profile] mindsplinters
Wow. It has been... a while. It's been a very long while. I cannot begin to list the reasons this concerns me and the reasons I suck.

So I'll start with the first, simple one.

I feel so off-kilter. This is the first year in well over a decade that I haven't signed up for Yuletide. I can still do pinch hits but... The deadline just crept up on me and then, looking over the list, nothing grabbed me. I can't shake the worry that this means my writers block is far worse than I thought.

August 2013

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3
4 5 6789 10
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 22nd, 2017 04:49 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios